Module 3 – Texts and Polls

I don’t text much and it’s usually a response to another text, so when my MVCR class required me to send a text for a poll, I was forced to figure out how to send a new text on my phone. My philosophy is, why text when you can talk? After talking to the younger generation, I realize that their philosophy is more like, why talk when you can text.

I am not sure where I would use texting with my students. There is an article, “Five Ways to Use Texting in the Classroom,” (http://connected.waldenu.edu/archive/item/663-five-ways-to-use-texting-in-the-classroom) that gives several good uses of texting, although most of them are for K-12 – eliminating home room announcements; communicating with parents about absences, tardies, and homework; and tweeting or texting updates, announcements, and activities into a school website.

One interesting use of texting is to text Google (466453) with a question or problem: Translation – hello in French; Glossary – define zenith; Calculator – 1 pint in liters. This could be very helpful when you need a short answer in a hurry. I tried a few theological terms, but did not get an answer for those. The response time, however, is almost immediate. That’s pretty impressive.

I could see the possibility of using polling. Frequently, in theological classes, we cover the historical positions or interpretive options on a particular topic. Taking a poll to see which of those options are held by the students could be interesting. They might not be willing to commit to raising a hand in the classroom, but might be willing to respond to a poll.

These counts as asynchronous communication since the answers/responses can come at a different time than the poll or text is started. Polling will probably be used more often in a synchronous setting (looking for a quick response), but texts can be valid for hours, days or even weeks and polls could even be given over a period of a day or longer.

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